#LearnFromTheBest #004 - Gems From Steve Jobs

I'll be upfront about it: I think Steve Jobs was the most gifted "creator" modern history has seen. He bent the Universe to his will and changed how modern society not only interacts with technology but with each other. His "reality distortion field" could sound like new age mumbo-jumbo but once you realize how essential it is to have some version of this to continue progress in the face of failure, it becomes clear that whatever it is, it's powerful, and it's real.

So, here's the second time I've chosen Jobs for #LearnFromTheBest:

Some (of the MANY) enlightening quotes from this video:

Everything around you that you call life, was made up by people that are no smarter than you.
[You have to be passionate] because it's so hard, if you don't, any rational person would give up. It's really hard, and you have to do it over a sustained period of time, so if you don't love it, you're going to give up.
If you're a great person, why do you want to work for somebody that you can't learn anything from?
You've got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology.
Some mistakes will be made along the way. That's GOOD, because at least some decisions are being made along the way.

If you're at all interested in learning more from the life of Steve Jobs, his failures and successes, I highly recommend reading (or listening to) the eponymous Biography by Walter Isaacson.

Daily Motivation #007 - BREAK THE RULES AND WORK HARD

Arnold Schwarzenegger was told repeatedly he could never be a movie star because of his laughable accent. Yet, it was presicely this funny accent that led to one of the most famous lines in movie history: 

"I'll be back"

But it wasn't just landing a lucky role in Terminator that made Arnold a household name; it was his work ethic and ability to keep pushing even when he was the only one who believed that got him there in the first place. So, whether you're working on a new startup, closing a big sale, building a relationship, or, of course, transforming your body at the gym, let Arnold's powerful words and the soundtrack from Inception get you (back) on track. 

Positive programming starts in 3... 2... 1...

And a bonus:

"Whenever you feel like you have lost your way or you are in need of that extra bit of confidence to move forward, play this film. Believe in yourself and never ever listen to the naysayers!"

Daily Quotation #006

I was sent this amazing quote today:

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation) there is one elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: That the moment one definitely commits oneself, then providence moves too. All sorts of things occur that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance, which no (human) could have dreamed would come his way."

- Goethe

 

#LearnFromTheBest #001 - Richard Branson

The best way to learn is through experience, but as Tony Robbins has pointed out: Why not learn from the experiences of successful people, too? You can learn from years of success and failure in the space of an hour during an interview or a couple days reading a book.

In that spirit here's the first in a new series #LearnFromTheBest:

Chase Jarvis welcomes Sir Richard Branson as his guest on 30 Days of Genius.

The Hilarious Paradox of Understanding Our Reality

About 5:30 this morning something woke me up unexpectedly. Whether it was a dog barking or a truck honking its horn or even a sound at all, I cannot remember. The part I remember so clearly is my reaction to the dream I had just been having. It was a profound understanding wrapped in a nice bundle of laughter. 

I had been dreaming about... well, things and scenery that kept changing in that fluid easy-come easy-go manner that dreams have, but the last part involved broken glass, a woman who had dropped one of those tiny-ships-in-a-bottle. I can't say if I was the woman or just observing. But the scene quickly melted into us at a film studio. She and I were trying to set up an impossibly useless and inept tripod. Really, this thing had no point and had been engineered by someone in the 2-5 years-old range, but it's a dream so of course it's just a normal part of life...

I can't completely fill you in on all the details because the scenery and people kept oozing from one thing to the next, but at some point that woman found herself in trouble with the boss. She was getting an earful. Then I went over and somehow we were back to the room with the broken glass. At that point I understood that the woman was actually the widow of the owner of the production company! So I asked her how she ended up being yelled at by this production manager or whoever it was, and about the broken glass. So, she proceeded to explain it all to me:

It was gibberish. Technically, it was english. And, technically, there was proper grammar, but I had no freaking clue what she was saying. In fact, it was so frustrating trying to understand, that I started getting a dream-headache.

Then I woke up.

I sat up, confused about what she said, and thought to myself, "That was so strange! What was she saying? Since I was the dreamer, some part of me should know what it was she was saying. After all, they were actually my words coming from her mouth. Maybe I can remember and decipher her message..."

And then I started laughing. "How funny that I was the one dreaming, creating the scene, and speaking the words, and yet I couldn't understand what I had created!"

That's when it hit me: That's life! We create everything around us and yet we can't always understand our own creation. Life is confusing: There's a code that we can't seem to crack. People speak in tongues to us, and we are disconnected from everything that happens around us, seemingly subject to worldly tides. But all we have to do is understand that there is no possible disconnection, our higher Self does know the Code, because it's what created everything we experience. 

We created the Lock, so of course we have the Key.

Are You AIMING to Win, or Avoiding a Loss?

I relearned something this past week I'd like to share.

 

Texas Hold 'em.

You've seen this game of poker on ESPN (the "World Series of Poker") at some point. Well, ESPN2, or 3, or 5. It's the one with the misfit-looking bunch of men (and some women) without a clue how to dress and a penchant for sunglasses and baseball caps to hide their "tells." In the poker world, this is the game of kings. I won't bore you with the details of how its played. You just need to know that luck plays a part but skill is the reason why so many of the same professionals are at the final table of the World Series every year. They play their opponents, not just their cards.

I learned how to play as a replacement to Blackjack. Long story short: I'm pretty good. I don't really gamble, I haven't got the resources or desire to lose huge sums of money, but tournaments are a great way to risk only a small buy-in, such as $25 or $100, for the potential to win something like $300 or $2500.

They're no "World Series" but they require a great deal of skill. In tournaments, many enter, and only one survives. Ok, it's not that dramatic but it's very intense in the moment.

"What's this got to do with LIFE:REVISITED? What's this got to do with changing my Life?"

We're getting there.

At first, I thrived. "Give me your chips now so we can skip to the inevitable conclusion," was my general attitude. I won a lot. So I kept moving up to harder and harder tournaments.

Then, I started hitting a rough patch and couldn't finish a table for my life. I wasn't on cruise control any more. My hot-streak turned Arctic. It started with a couple losses and then turned into a long streak of misery. "It's the cards; they've been horrible for me." "People are so irrational!" "That guy called all-in on a 3-6 offsuit and caught a runner-runner straight!! Are you f(*#)&@* kidding me??"

But then I realized something. Or, really: I just acknowledged something I knew already but couldn't bare to admit: I was playing horribly. I was playing scared. I was trying NOT TO LOSE. 

The moment I said this consciously to myself, I started having fun and started winning again. I started "playing to win." I still lose. It happens. Sometimes it's bad luck, but more often it's because I played poorly. I acknowledge this, and move on. I stay aggressive, smart, and hungry to win. My mindset was everything. It is everything. 

I'm sure you're already making the connection between my experience with poker and changes you can make in your own life. Whether it's in sports, business, or relationships, most of us play "not to lose." This makes us so protective of what we've got, so scared of losing it, that we never gain anything more. And often we still lose it, anyway! 

We all have a choice: Are we happy with what we've created around us, or do we want to create the life that we know we deserve? 

There are a bunch of different ways to start on this path of conscious-creation, but I'd like to share the very powerful understanding I've relearned from Hold 'em:

Take the necessary risks, bounce back from failures quickly, and stay hungry for the next step in creating the life you were born for. I'm not saying don't be happy in the moment. I recommend a sense of gratitude for everything and everyone in your life at this moment. But if you've got that nagging sense that you're not living up to your full potential, and know you are capable of much more, then don't SETTLE for less. And, the only way to keep moving forward is to take the necessary steps. Do what you know you need to do: Risk losing something to gain everything. 

Play to win.